National Gallery of Australia | Audio Tour | Grace Cossington Smith

Sinopsis

Audio guide to works from the NGA exhibition Grace Cossington Smith: A retrospective exhibition, shown at the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra 4 March – 13 June 2005

Episodios

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Interior with verandah doors 1954

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Interior with verandah doors 1954

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Interior with verandah doors 1954, oil on composition board, 76.2 (h) x 91.0 (w) cm, signed and dated l.l., black oil paint "G. Cossington Smith 54".Collection of the National Gallery of Australia. Bequest of Lucy Swanton 1982

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Interior in yellow 1962, 1964

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Interior in yellow 1962, 1964

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Cossington Smith said of her painting Interior in yellow: ‘The subject took me very much. It is a room with a wardrobe and a bed and carpet but the chief thing to me was the yellow walls…the whole thing is meant to express an interior with light…the sunlight did not come in in a definite way but the whole room seemed to be full of light, which is what I want to do more than the actual sunlight. I feel that even the shadows are a subdued light and they must have light in them as well as the light parts.’ (Interview with Hazel de Berg, 1965, National Library of Australia)

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Orchestral concert: Dr Sargent conducting in the Sydney Town Hall c.1939

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Orchestral concert: Dr Sargent conducting in the Sydney Town Hall c.1939

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Orchestral concert: Dr Sargent conducting in the Sydney Town Hall c.1939, oil,pencil, pen and ink on cardboard on composition board, 45.9 (h) x 41.0 (w) cm. Collection of the National Gallery of Australia

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Portrait of Diddy c.1922

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Portrait of Diddy c.1922

    22/11/2007 Duración: 59s

    Some of Cossington Smith’s most successful portraits are her tender drawings of family members. Her close bond with her family is evident in her drawings of her father Ernest and her sisters Diddy and Madge, depicted in uncontrived, relaxed poses. In Portrait of Diddy her sister appears meditative, wearing the artist’s favourite colour, yellow. As she said: ‘Yellow is the colour of the sun’. This work was in an extremely fragile condition and is being shown for the first time since entering the Gallery’s collection, thanks to the dedicated efforts of the Gallery’s conservators.

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Eastern Road, Turramurra [The Eastern Road, Turramurra] c.1926

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Eastern Road, Turramurra [The Eastern Road, Turramurra] c.1926

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    This work, with its sweeping directional movement of the road through the centre of the picture plane, depicts Eastern Road near the artist’s home in Turramurra at a time when it was still a semi-rural suburb. The watercolour was preceded by a detailed sketchbook drawing with precise colour notations. Cossington Smith told Daniel Thomas that when she was doing her initial drawing she was ‘pleased that a figure came onto the road to animate its emptiness’.

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Poinsettias 1931

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Poinsettias 1931

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Poinsettias 1931, oil on pulpboard, 73.7 (h) x 59.7 (w) cm, Art Gallery of South Australia Ivor Francis Bequest Fund 1995

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Still life with red vase 1962

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Still life with red vase 1962

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Still life with red vase 1962, oil on hardboard, 62.5 (h) x 89.8 (w) cm, Private collection, courtesy of Eva Breuer Art Dealer, Sydney

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Boots, Sketchbook of still life and various subjects (1911)

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Boots, Sketchbook of still life and various subjects (1911)

    22/11/2007 Duración: 51s

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Boots, Sketchbook of still life and various subjects (1911), Sketchbook, pencil, paper, 22.8 (h) x 28.8 (w) cm, Collection of the National Gallery of Australia

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, The Bridge in-curve (1930)

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, The Bridge in-curve (1930)

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, The Bridge in-curve (1930), empera on cardboard, 83.6 (h) x 111.8 (w) cm, National Gallery of Victoria Presented by the National Gallery Society of Victoria, 1967

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Enid on the sofa 1957

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Enid on the sofa 1957

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Cossington Smith’s daring painting of Enid Cambridge is a portrait of a long-held friendship. Rather than attempting to depict her friend’s features, she conveys her in flamboyant dress, relaxed in an interior world. At the time of Cambridge’s death in 1976, Cossington Smith wrote: ‘Everyone loved Enid. She is my dearest art friend … A special quality of Enid’s is a devoted religious Faith which shone through all her perplexities and difficulties and never left her … Enid is a shining Personality.’ (National Gallery of Australia research library)

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Church interior c.1941-42

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Church interior c.1941-42

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Cossington Smith painted church interiors related to theme of the Second World War. They depict St James’ Anglican Church in Turramurra, a place of great significance for Cossington Smith and her family as their regular place of worship since their arrival in the area in 1913. In the painting Church interior there are women, children and older men. Missing are the men who had gone to war, giving an added poignancy to the image.

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Self portrait 1948

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Self portrait 1948

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Self portrait 1948, oil on cardboard 40.0 (h) x 30.0 (w) cm, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Purchased 2002

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Bush at evening 1947

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Bush at evening 1947

    22/11/2007 Duración: 46s

    While in the bush Cossington Smith often adopted Cézanne’s strategy of meditating on the motif in nature for long periods of time. She said that of all the painters she admired, ‘there aren’t any others that impress me like Cézanne ... I think that he painted what I wanted … that was a help, to see that done’. (Interview with Alan Roberts, 1970)

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Interior with wardrobe mirror 1955

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Interior with wardrobe mirror 1955

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    In Interior with wardrobe mirror the artist recreates her bedroom from multiple perspectives. Two wardrobe doors are open; one revealing a close-up of drawers within the cupboard, the other with a mirror reflecting the garden and sky outside. It is a miraculous, poetic integration of intimate interior space and the exterior sun-filled environment – the parts and the whole illuminated by vibrant colour. As in all of Cossington Smith’s late interiors, we become aware of spaces in which complexity is made to look effortless.

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Landscape at Pentecost (road and trees) c.1932

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Landscape at Pentecost (road and trees) c.1932

    22/11/2007 Duración: 41s

    By 1932 the Sydney moderns were in full swing with the opening of Dorrit Black’s Modern Art Centre. Encouraged by the mood and pace set by Black and other artists returning from Europe, Cossington Smith showed adventurous works at the Centre inspired by Paul Gauguin and Franz Marc. Her mentor at the time, Ethel Anderson, had long been an admirer of Gauguin’s work. Following the death of her mother, Cossington Smith’s visits to Anderson increased and she began to paint works informed by Gauguin, such as Landscape at Pentecost (road and trees) and Horses.

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Things on an iron tray on the floor c.1928

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Things on an iron tray on the floor c.1928

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    By time she did this painting Cossington Smith had moved beyond her early art training with Dattilo Rubbo. She recalled that while her art teacher was concerned about depth in representing a scene, she had become more interested in depicting radiating, concentric forms in luminous colour. As she said: ‘In those days I saw things as a pattern expressed in colour. It was quite a natural thing. I didn’t force myself to do it … I believe you’ve got to have a feeling about what you want to paint. It’s half unconscious, but you do know what you don’t want to do’. (Interview with Alan Roberts, 1970)

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Rushing c.1922

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Rushing c.1922

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Rushing c.1922, oil on canvas on paperboard, 65.6 (h) x 91.3 (w) cm, Art Gallery of New South Wales Purchased 1967 © Art Gallery New South Wales

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Centre of a city c.1925

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Centre of a city c.1925

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Centre of a city has a monumental presence: the impressive architectural forms rising up to a luminous blue sky. The painting was preceded by numerous sketchbook drawings. In 1971 the artist told Daniel Thomas: ‘I suddenly liked the subject – the Centre of the City! I liked the going downhill of Moore Street, the feeling that the Post Office at the bottom was the centre of the city … I would stand with this [sketch] book. I was just aware that people would look over my shoulder … they never said anything – that was nice’.

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, The Lacquer Room 1935-36

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, The Lacquer Room 1935-36

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, The Lacquer Room 1935-36, oil on paperboard on plywood, 74.0 (h) x 90.8 (w) cm, Art Gallery of New South Wales Purchased 1967 © Art Gallery New South Wales

  • Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Reinforcements: troops marching c.1917

    Grace COSSINGTON SMITH, Reinforcements: troops marching c.1917

    22/11/2007 Duración: 01min

    Reinforcements: Troops marching conveys a sense of ritual and occasion. It represents a farewell to the volunteers going off to fight in the First World War. Flags flutter above the buildings and women with their backs to us wave in support. A small child in the foreground breaks free from the crowd and cries in what could be seen as a symbolic loss of innocence. It is an early example of the artist’s work in which vibrant colour, rhythm and pattern are combined with emotive content.

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